draculauntold:

Every Bloodline Has a Beginning. Dracula Untold: Trailer 

A weird thing I find incredibly helpful for art/writing.

heecawroo:

deadcantdraw:

Eplans.com is a website that sells blueprints for houses. 

This might not seem that helpful but if you want a characters house you can make selections based on what sort of house you want them to live in. 

image

Then browse through the results and find the house you want. Then you can view the blueprints and have a room layout for that house, which can help with visualising the space they live in. 

image

It makes describing generic homes so much easier.

thank you

(Source: eplans.com, via fixyourwritinghabits)

antisociallysplendid:

lalagirgurl:

bluedragonkaiser:

dailylifeofadisneyfreak:

Waking up on November 1st is literally like walking through a door from Halloweentown to Christmastown

What’s this? What’s this? There’s décor everywhere. What’s this? There’s carols in the air. What’s this? I can’t believe my eyes it’s just November come on folks I mean I swear. What’s this?

I FREAKING READ IT IN JACKS VOICE 

I FUCKING SANG IT

(via bloodyyasi)

"Trust your story."

Neil Gaiman (via psliterary)

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

all-s33ing-eye asked:
A couple of years ago I posted most of my poems on Wattpad (a free, non-profit writing website). I thought of submitting a couple of them to magazines, but does Wattpad count as 'previously published'? All the magazines say the writing can never have been published before, I'm just not sure if Wattpad fits into that category.

characterandwritinghelp:

Bad news on this front. From what I see, it looks like you may be out of luck. Some writing anthologies/literary magazines/similar publications may allow you to submit it if you take down the original on Wattpad, so a reread of the rules or an email to the editors may be in order. If you think you have a strong reason for the editors to consider including your piece, send them an email and make your case.

-Headless

zhaiofrp asked:
My character is hit by an arrow to the shoulder from a considerable distance. Would it be possible for the arrow to hit a muscle and somewhat incapacitate her arm? If so, how long would it take to completely heal, if ever? Thank you so much!

howtofightwrite:

Yes. It would actually be fairly difficult to get hit in the shoulder and not significantly impair the arm. Muscles slide over one another to allow movement. Impaling with an arrow through them will prevent this, completely immobilizing anything it pierces.

I’m going to stick a very rough baseline of 6 months for recovery time, but there are a lot of factors at work here, and that’s basically a guess. The older your character is, the slower they’ll heal. Wooden arrows are a fantastic vector for infection, which will outright kill them. Availability of clean food and medical care will affect this. If the arrow punches through the shoulder blade or breaks any other bones, those will need to be set, and will take a long time to heal.

A well meaning person ripping the arrow out (including your character), is a good way to kill your character quickly from blood loss.

I think I’ve posted this before, but, first aid for someone who’s been impaled is:

  • First, and this is a general first aid rule: your safety is more important than the victim’s. This isn’t a selfish statement; it’s to avoid a “well now we have two problems” situation.

    This also isn’t a hypothetical issue; you see this all the time, something horrifying happens, people rush in to help, and get injured. It happened to me, and is part of the reason I walk with a limp when I’m tired.

  • Leave the foreign object in the wound. Do not try to remove it yourself. There are exceptions, such as when you need to perform CPR and it is in your way or if the foreign object is actually causing more damage by remaining. Though, if you’re at the point of needing to perform CPR and can’t because the sword sticking out of the victim’s chest is in the way, CPR is probably not going to help much.

  • Keep the victim calm, if they thrash around or panic, they will make things worse. Movement will aggravate the wound, in most cases speeding bleed out. Panic will elevate the heart rate, which will also increase the speed of bleed out.

  • Call for EMS (that’s 911 if you’re in the States) If the object is something that’s part of the environment (such as a piece of rebar imbedded in concrete) tell them. They will need to bring equipment to cut the victim down.

  • A good EMS operator should be able to talk you through most of the rest, but, if they don’t or can’t:

  • Try to get the victim’s clothing away from the injury, this will involve some tearing, but it did on the way in, so…

  • Do what you can to make the victim comfortable. You don’t want to move them, but anything that reduces physical strain could save their life.

  • Pack bandages around the entry and exit points to slow the bleeding. This can be any lose fabric in a pinch, though gauze is better. Packing it in around the wound should keep a lose object from wobbling and further aggravating the wound.

  • Keep them alert, do this by talking to them, and keeping their mind active. This is to prevent them from going into shock. Once they’ve gone into shock their chances of survival drop massively. Ideally you need to keep talking to them through the entire ordeal. Try to maintain a calm and even tone.

  • Wait for help to arrive.

-Starke